David: Blessed Forgiveness

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David sinned and God forgave him. Never the less, God used him in unique ways. The Lord is great in His mercy and covers our imperfections. God takes our lives and makes something beautiful of them. The blessings are His in our lives.

David: Consequences of Sin

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The Bible is very clear about the forgiveness of sins. “If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness” (1 Jn. 1: 9). David himself has experienced the joy of forgiveness, as told in his psalm: “I acknowledge my sin to you, and I did not cover my iniquity; I said, “I will confess my transgressions to the Lord” and you forgave the iniquity of my sin. ” (Ps. 32: 5).

The Lord forgave David’s sin, but his life and reign were effected. Despite the forgiveness of sins, David had to reap the consequences of his sin; but we must distinguish between the temporal and the eternal consequences of sin.

Life is Love, part 3

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After bathing in the lake and the sea (ie, reflection on Ecclesiastes and Job), we dive into the ocean – the book Song of Songs. The very title of it indicates that this is the best of the songs, the apex of romantic poetry. Love in its every verse. Read at least the first verse: “Let him kiss me with kisses of his mouth, for thy love is better than wine.” I would have never started one of the books of the Bible with these words. In fact, there are words in the book that are even more risqué.

You cannot erase the words of a song once written, and even more from the Song of Songs. One can only wonder how “the babbling of lovers” has become a part of the Bible, especially since it never mentions God! Perhaps it is because God is in it everywhere, in every verse. Where there is love, there is God. Let’s listen to the best of all the songs.

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

Life Is Suffering, part 2

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The Book of Job is full of paradox and mystery, but it is direct and applies to our modern times even though it was written perhaps about four thousand years ago. The author touches several problems, the problem of suffering, the relationship between righteousness and prosperity and finally reconciling God’s existence and the presence of suffering in the world. Why is there evil in the world if an all-good and almighty God created and governs it? How do we answer this paradox? Job and his friends attempt to answer these questions until God speaks. Listen to the sermon, “Life is suffering.”

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

Life Is Vanity, part 1

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Ecclesiastes is one of the most paradoxical, controversial books of the Bible. In his fascinating essay, the author shows that there is no meaning to life without God, and that God gives meaning to all our activities. Let’s look at the book of Ecclesiastes and observe its reflections on life.

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

All We Need, Part 4

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We finish the meditation on the spiritual quest of Asaph. He had envied the wicked and doubted God when he observed the wicked prospering. He found spiritual healing in the sanctuary, his thinking changed and he gazed upon God’s goodness. Asaph found peace only when he went into the sanctuary of God. He realized that his arguments were superficial and hasty. He was as a beast: foolish, ignorant and narrow-minded in his reasoning. He gave vent to his feelings, guided by instinct, without assessing the situation with biblical perspective. He did not understand that there is more than this life, thinking that what we receive both our reward and punishment on earth. Only when the psalmist drew closer to God was his heart settled. The situation did not change much, if at all. The wicked continue to prosper, but the Psalmist was changed. He has found God!

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

Theological Thinking, Part 3

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In Psalm 73, Asaph overcomes his confusion and doubt caused by the prosperity of the wicked by affirming God’s goodness. Asaph’s thinking changed when he walked into the sanctuary. He rose to a new spiritual level of thinking. He understood when he drew close to God. After visiting the sanctuary, he was now in a position to properly assess his state. “When my heart was embittered and I was pierced within, then I was senseless and ignorant; I was like a beast before You.”(Ps. 72:21-22). Asaph began to think spiritually.

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

What Happens in the Sanctuary, Part 2

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Psalm 73 deals with some weighty issues such as sin, the punishment for sin, the prosperity the wicked and the suffering of the righteous. The Psalm deals with the paradox between God’s omnipotence and goodness on the one hand and the presence of evil in the world on the other. Asaph was confused as he watched the blatant injustice of this world. His envy of the unbelievers’ carefree and satiated life almost destroyed his faith …
Inspiration came in the sanctuary. Let’s hear how to solve Asaph’s problem.

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich

Crisis of Faith, Part 1

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The Song of Asaph (Psalm 73) is a chasm of wealth and wisdom. We need a minimum of four sermons just to begin to understand its depths, but it will serve us very well. First we’ll talk about the experiences of Asaph as he observes the prosperity of the wicked. He was nearly shipwrecked in his faith. Next, in “Finding Faith”, we look at the spiritual healing of Asaph, which occurred in the sanctuary. (We need to know where and whom to go when your faith was weakening.) Then we’ll talk about Asaph’s perspective after meeting with God and how his opinion changed about the wicked, about himself, and about God. (We sometime lack Spiritual thinking.) In the last sermon, we will look at the bliss of being with God. Asaph became closer to God and cried out, “Who do I have in heaven but You and there is nothing on earth that I desire besides You.” (Ps. 73:25).
Every pious listener will at times feel like Asaph, but will in the end experience the great blessings of God’s closeness.

Teacher: Leonid Mikhovich